Mayo-Clinic-in-the-News-300x803No, but apparently they can still be used for some aspects of healthcare marketing. I cite this example from The Huffington Post about a Google Hangout on Air hosted by a physician from the world renowned Mayo Clinic:

Let My Doctor Sleep
Hosted by Alicia Menendez

A new study shows that doctor fatigue raises the risk of car accidents after long shifts. How does fatigue impair medical care?

Circulation: The Huffington Post attracts over 28 million monthly unique viewers.

Context: This study appeared in the Dec. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Colin West., M.D., Ph.D., the lead author, is a General Internal Medicine physician at Mayo Clinic. His research focuses primarily on physician well-being, evidence-based medicine and biostatistics, and medical education. Dr. West participated in this Google Hangout with eight other people. This function within Google Plus allows users to have live, face-to-face, multi-person video chats with chosen participants. Google Hangouts On Air are Hangouts in which the video stream displays publicly on the Google Plus profile page of the user who launched the chat. They can also be displayed on the user’s YouTube channel or website.

Get more at the source: Google Hangouts On Air | Mayo Clinic In The News

If the Mayo Clinic is using Google Hangouts on Air, perhaps it’s a good indication that they are safe for other medical institutions to use for marketing when done correctly.

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