Filter bubbles; what they are and how to create them

A few years ago, Eli Pariser did a now famous TED talk on the concept of filter bubbles. Here it is in case you haven’t seen it yet:

Now as a consumer of information this concerns me on some levels but as an internet marketer, it gives me all kinds of reasons to love any tool that allows me to create my own filter bubbles for myself or my clients and to use this to my/our advantage. I have come to believe that the best tool for creating these bubbles is Google+. Here’s Rand Fishkin of Moz talking about how it works:

Here are some of the world’s greatest Google+ practitioners [and Hulk Hogan] discussing how to put Rand’s insights into practice:

Does it work? It’s scary how well it does! If you agree with me that the number one benefit of using the internet for thought leadership is to get found when people are looking for you or what you do, Google+ is now the most important tool for you to understand and leverage. It’s all happening here…

The Power of YouTube

English: YouTube-like logo for userboxes. This...

Imagine a place where people go to actually watch ads and where marketers can take all the time they want to unfold a story. That magical place is called YouTube and UPS shows us how it’s done:

If you can count on anything during the holidays, it’s advertisements that take aim at your heart — and this one hits the bullseye.

The spot from UPS highlights the bond between a 4-year-old boy named Carson and UPS driver Ernest Lagasca, who Carson calls “Mr. Ernie.”

“When Carson was born he couldn’t drink milk or anything with a milk protein in it, so they sent formula,” the boy’s mom, Karen Kight, told KRDO. “Mr. Ernie would deliver quite a few times to our house.”

Carson loves Mr. Ernie and his truck so much that he has a UPS uniform of his own and dreams of being a UPS driver. And when Mr. Ernie comes to the door in the ad, Carson practically leaps into his arms.

“I could come here three times in week and I’d get the same reaction every single time, all that excitement,” Lagasca says in the spot.

But in the commercial, Lagasca isn’t bringing an ordinary package. As part of the UPS Your Wishes Delivered campaign, he’s delivering a child-sized UPS truck to help make Carson’s dream come true.

When I drove up, that moment was just amazing,” Lagasca told Fox21 News.

Armed with a crayon map, Carson proceeds to drive around the neighborhood, delivering boxes of cookies and such.

Source: UPS Makes A Little Boy’s Wish Come True In Heartwarming Holiday Ad

How To Become a Thought Leader In 13 Steps

Thoughtleadership is not a dirty word, in fact, it’s a necessity. Here are some good thoughts on how to achieve it…

“Thought leadership in today’s world has a lot to do with content creation and distribution. This article is a prime example of a notch towards hopefully better thought leadership for myself.The idea is I write a useful article, which you read. Since I gave you solid information, you now trust and respect me – and that might lead to more business in some way, shape, or form. Whether you buy one of our startup consultation packages, web development, or any other “product” that I sell, or it could be as simple as the SEO benefits from the non-reciprocal link.Remember that content creation can be anything from blogging to speaking on a panel at a local event. It’s any form of media or action that puts your story further into the marketable world in a way that translates to attention and hopeful credibility.” Go to the source for more: How To Become a Thought Leader In 13 Steps | SEJ.

How to use Circlecount and Circloscope to find relevant people in Google Plus

5,000 people make seem like a lot to be able to circle, but if you’re serious about using Google Plus to build your personal or corporate brand, eventually you’ll want to get rid of some of the people you followed early on and find the most relevant people in your space to interact with. Enter Circlecount and Circloscope — two great Google Plus tools that go together like peanut butter and chocolate. Here are some of the things I’ve learned with early experiments with both tools.